HMRI Historical Timeline

Pasadena Foundation for Medical Research (PFMR)

1952

Institute of Medical Research (IMR)

1953

Safer Auto Design

1955

The Shunt Project

1955

Mass Spectrometer Protein Studies

1958

Advanced Cobalt Therapy Laboratory

1959

PFMR Links Smog to Cancer

1963

PFMR pioneers Biomedical Lasers

1963

PFMR’s First Electron Microscope

1964

IMR becomes Huntington Institute of Applied Medical Research (HIAMR)

1967

Experimental Cardiology

1969

Tele-Stimulator

1971

CT Stereotactic Neurosurgery

1978

Prostate Cancer I – PC-3 Cell Line

1979

PFMR and HIAMR merge to become Huntington Medical Research Institutes

1982

Brain Tumor Immunotherapy

1982

NMR

1982

MRS Laboratory

1988

Cancer Genetics

1996

Gene Therapy

1998

Molecular Neurology

1998

Liver Center

2004

Ground-breaking day for new building

2015

History

HMRI was founded in 1952 with the goal of developing knowledge and technology to change the way physicians diagnose and treat diseases.

HMRI is the product of multiple roots, including the Institute of Medical Research at Huntington Hospital, the Pasadena Neurovascular Foundation, the Huntington Institute of Applied Medical Research and the Pasadena Foundation for Medical Research.

Two HMRI founding medical directors, George Sharp, MD, and Hunter Shelden, MD, molded our research programs based on their research at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the Mayo Clinic.

A Rich Legacy at HMRI

Dr. Richard J. Bing

 

Dr. Richard Bing

Dr. Richard Bing

Dr. Richard J. Bing (1901-2010) left an indelible mark at HMRI. His discoveries in cardiology, cardiac metabolism, cardiac catheterization, congenital heart disease, blood flow measurement in the heart, his later important work (completed in his eighties and nineties) on nitric oxide and its relation to restoring blood flow after a heart attack, and on the dangers of COX-2 inhibitors, gave him the reputation of a renaissance researcher among his colleagues.

 

He joined the Institutes in 1969 and left his research laboratory at the age of 98, having published the last ones of his more than 500 journal articles and medical books in his nineties.

 

Bing set the standard for generations of researchers to come. He is unquestionably one of the HMRI giants on whose shoulders we stand.